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Just For Love 1970 Album

Just For Love Just For Love
31
Affinity
100%
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1.5
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1
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3.5
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Length
39m 50s
Country
United States
Release Dates
1970-08-00
Description
Just for Love is the fourth album by American psychedelic rock band Quicksilver Messenger Service. Released in August 1970, it marks the culmination of a transition from the extended, blues- and jazz-inspired improvisations of their first two albums to a more traditional rock sound. Founding member Dino Valenti, who returned to the band after a stint in prison on drug charges, was largely responsible for the new sound. Valenti's influence is readily apparent throughout; he composed eight of the album's nine tracks under the pen name Jesse Oris Farrow. Despite the marked change in the band's sound, it was their third straight album to reach the Top 30 on the Billboard charts, peaking at number 27. The only single culled from the album, "Fresh Air", became the band's biggest hit, reaching number 49.
artist
producer
label
Other Roles
Greg Elmore
Greg Elmore
Drums, Percussion
David Freiberg
David Freiberg
Bass, Backing Vocals, Guitar
John Cipollina
John Cipollina
Steel, slide and Electric Guitars, Backing Vocals
Gary Duncan
Gary Duncan
Guitar, Backing Vocals, bass, maracas, wood Block
Dino Valenti
Dino Valenti
Guitar, Lead Vocals, Flute, Conga
Tracklist
1. Wolf Run (Part 1) 1m 12s
2. Just for Love (Part 1) 3m
3. Cobra 4m 23s
4. The Hat 10m 36s
5. Freeway Flyer 3m 49s
6. Gone Again 7m 17s
7. Fresh Air 5m 21s
8. Just for Love (Part 2) 1m 38s
9. Wolf Run (Part 2) 2m 10s

Reviews

All Reviews
The first of two "Hawaii" albums, delineated as such because the band recorded them there, at the whim of Dino Valenti, the mercurial folk singer who finally returned to the group he originally formed. So too, had guitarist Gary Duncan. With these two back in the fold, there seemed to be talent boiling over and time ripe enough for a huge breakthrough. Instead, these two albums, although they have their moments, are high up there on the self-indulgent scale. Of the two, it's Just For Love that still contains the strongest link to the jam-heavy past, featuring a Cipollina-authored piece that's up there with Quicksilver's best instrumentals ("Cobra"), along with "Gone Again", where Valenti's wailing vocal wafts through the hazy musical smoke. "Fresh Air" sounds like a Santana track that has been given some band-centric quirks, with Cipollina and Hopkins solos, and the "have another hit..." refrain. The band attempts the same trick with "The Hat" in a softer, country-blues style which never really develops over the course of its' ten and a half minutes run time. "Freeway Flyer" is an OK garage-rocker, while two-part versions of "Wolf Run" and the title track round out the album, not doing much of anything but adding some atmosphere.
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