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Shady Grove 1969 Album

Shady Grove Shady Grove
Affinity
100%
0.5
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1
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1.5
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2
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2.5
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3
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3.5
1
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4
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4.5
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5
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Recent Ratings
3.5 jfclams
First Ratings
3.5 jfclams
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Item description
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Length
43m 26s
Country
United States
Release Dates
1969-12-00
Description
Shady Grove is a 1969 studio album by Quicksilver Messenger Service. Nicky Hopkins, the English journeyman pianist who appears on albums by Jeff Beck, The Rolling Stones, The Who, all four of The Beatles and Steve Miller, joined the group for this album. Hopkins' influence is felt throughout Shady Grove, and his contributions pushed the group in new directions. However, David Freiberg's vocal presence makes the Quicksilver sound of the first two albums still apparent. Original guitarist Gary Duncan does not appear on this album, having quit the band for a time.
artist
producer
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Other Roles
Greg Elmore
Greg Elmore
Drums, Percussion
Nicky Hopkins
Nicky Hopkins
Piano, Organ, Celeste, Harpsichord, Cello
John Cipollina
John Cipollina
Guitar, Vocals
David Freiberg
David Freiberg
Bass, Vocals, Viola, Guitar
Tracklist
1. Shady Grove 2m 59s
2. Flute Song 5m 17s
3. Three or Four Feet from Home 2m 58s
4. Too Far 4m 23s
5. Holy Moly 4m 20s
6. Joseph's Coat 4m 36s
7. Flashing Lonesome 5m 21s
8. Words Can't Say 3m 17s
9. Edward, the Mad Shirt Grinder 9m 10s

Reviews

All Reviews
For the third release famed journeyman session piano player Nicky Hopkins fills in for the departed Gary Duncan and becomes a new focal point for the Quicksilver sound, as he would stay in the group for a few more albums after this one. Truth be told, it's a rather patched-together affair, with songs from friendly outside sources used (Nick Gravenites and Denise Kaufman from all-female band the Ace of Cups, who had the same management as QMS), but even with the new elements it still retains some of the mysterious feel from the first two records. Plus, it adds in Hopkins' prodigious musicianship. His "Edward, the Mad Shirt Grinder" brings a final curtain call down on the album in entertaining fashion.
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