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Women And Children First 1980 Album

Women And Children First Women And Children First
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Length
33m 35s
Country
United States
Release Dates
1980-03-26
Description
Women and Children First is the third studio album by American rock band Van Halen, released on March 26, 1980, on Warner Bros. Records. Produced by Ted Templeman and engineered by Donn Landee, it was the first Van Halen album not to feature any cover songs, and is described by critic Stephen Thomas Erlewine as "[the] record where the group started to get heavier, both sonically and, to a lesser extent, thematically."
artist
producer
label
Other Roles
David Lee Roth
David Lee Roth
Lead Vocals, Acoustic Guitar on "Could This Be Magic?"
Michael Anthony
Michael Anthony
Bass, Backing Vocals
Eddie Van Halen
Eddie Van Halen
Guitar, Electric Piano, Backing Vocals
Donn Landee
Donn Landee
Engineer
Nicolette Larson
Nicolette Larson
Backing Vocals on "Could This Be Magic?"
Tracklist
1. And The Cradle Will Rock... 3m 31s
2. Everybody Wants Some!! 5m 5s
3. Fools 5m 55s
4. Romeo Delight 4m 19s
5. Tora! Tora! 57s
6. Loss Of Control 2m 36s
7. Take Your Whiskey Home 3m 9s
8. Could This Be Magic? 3m 8s
9. In A Simple Rhyme 4m 33s

Reviews

All Reviews
No discernible hit singles, but not to worry, because this is another great record. It’s the same basic party pop-metal sound, but the boys get a little more progressive with it here, with stunning results. “And the Cradle Will Rock” has the meatiest riff and best hook of the record, followed by the raucous rocker “Everybody Wants Some” which got its’ own Claymation scene in the cult movie “Better Off Dead”. “Fools”, “Romeo Delight”, and especially “Loss of Control” are simply unique little takes on hard rock with Eddie doing crazy and different things with riffs and other things I can’t even being to understand, yet are amazing to listen to. “Could This Be Magic” is one of those light-hearted, semi-acoustic exercises – like “Ice Cream Man” – which was second nature to these guys, and they pull it off with expertise. The last track, “In a Simple Rhyme”, even dabbles in psychedelic and progressive rock. Easily one of their best, and not to be missed.
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